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Nigerian dating schemes

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"Because a victim has legitimate feelings, they might be inclined to offer financial support for this person." For Best, it all started when she signed up for a free online dating site called mingle2.A man calling himself "John" messaged her and through daily phone calls and messages on Facebook, he gained her trust.

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"I left my heart out there, and this guy took advantage of it," the 51-year old Best said.He spoke with what she thought was a British accent and his picture on Facebook portrayed a nice-looking man with graying hair and a beard.In July, "John" told her that he was traveling to the United Kingdom to buy antiques for his store.Don’t send money to tide someone over after a mugging or robbery, and don’t do anyone a favor by making an online purchase or forwarding a package to another country.One request leads to another, and delays and disappointments will follow.Soon enough there is some sort of "emergency" with either the child suffering from a brain hemorrhage or "William" suffering a life threatening accident.

You will then be requested to send a large amount of money for treatment and promises that you will be paid back ASAP.

Millions of Americans use dating sites, social networking sites, and chat rooms to meet people. But scammers also use these sites to meet potential victims.

They create fake profiles to build online relationships, and eventually convince people to send money in the name of love.

CNNMoney's attempts to reach "John" on his international phone number provided by Best revealed that it was based out of Nigeria -- a hotbed for online scams -- and has since been disconnected. Victims are then prompted to pay $99 to have their name removed from the site.

The FBI said there is no indication that the information was ever removed.

When he told her days later he couldn't afford to eat, Best gave in, wiring him two $250 payments. soldiers serving abroad, then ask for money to purchase laptops, international phones or a plane ticket home so their fake relationship can continue. Army's Criminal Investigation Command says they receive hundreds of reports every month from people fooled by phony service members.