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Frequency of communication during dating

By today's standards, the "Super-Wasp" is a very primitive shortwave/ham receiver but performance can be surprisingly good if the operator has patience and is willing to put in a few nights learning how the "Super-Wasp" works.

Shown to the left of the K-115 is the K-120 Audio Booster Unit, another Pilot module (though it is not called "Redi-Blox") for builders, that could be used if loud speaker volume was desired.The "Super-Wasp" kit sold for $29.50 including the five pairs of plug-in coils providing tuning coverage from 500 meters to 14 meters or about 600kc up to about 21.5mc.Detailed instructions, including a full size blue print, made assembly relatively easy and assured that each "Super-Wasp" could perform pretty much as expected.Pilot offered "Redi-Blox" assembled modules in the late twenties to enthusiasts to help ease the mechanical side of kit building.Around the time that the "Super-Wasp" was introduced, Pilot changed the name of the company to "Pilot Radio & Tube Corporation" (April, 1929.) "Super-Wasp" receivers were quite popular and sometimes were found in ham shacks of the late twenties and early thirties.As a result, don't be hasty to judge a poor performing set as a "bad design." Check the receiver over carefully.

An inspection of the soldering will usually be a clue into the level of workmanship you will encounter in your receiver.

The stock circuit used a type 22 screen-grid tube as an RF amplifier, a 201-A as a regenerative detector and a 201-A tube as the first AF amplifier and a UX-112A as the second AF amplifier.

The user could substitute a 201A for the last audio stage and reduce the plate voltage and bias voltage if a UX-112A was not available.

The three tubes were usually 201-A and the circuit used a regenerative detector followed by two stages of transformer coupled AF amplification.

The kit included detailed instructions along with an assembly drawing.

The "Wasp" was introduced just as Shortwave Broadcasting was beginning to grow and everyone wanted to tune in to stations located in foreign countries.