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What percentage of the population uses online dating

what percentage of the population uses online dating-41

At the same time, there has been a 69-point bump among those ages 30-49, from 8% in 2005 to 77% today.

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Nearly two-thirds of American adults (65%) use social networking sites, up from 7% when Pew Research Center began systematically tracking social media usage in 2005.Those who have attended at least some college are more likely than those with a high school diploma or less to use social media, a trend that has been consistent since 2005.In that year, 4% of those with a high school diploma or less used social media, along with 8% of those who attended some college and 12% of college graduates.The first prominent online dating site was Match.com, which launched in 1995.e Harmony started in 2000, Ok Cupid in 2004, and more recently, a wave of mobile people-swiping apps, like Tinder and Hinge, have become wildly popular.As for the current online dating options—they strike me as a good first crack at this by humanity, but the kind of thing we’ll significantly improve on to the point where the way it was done in 2014 will seem highly outdated in not too many years.

Now that the stigma has diminished, you know this industry is going to race ahead because there’s so much money to be made by whoever can be innovative.

Pew Research reports have documented in great detail how the rise of social media has affected such things as work, politics and political deliberation, communications patterns around the globe, as well as the way people get and share information about health, civic life, news consumption, communities, teenage life, parenting, dating and even people’s level of stress.

A special analysis of 27 national surveys of Americans across the past decade documents this substantial spread of technology throughout the population, although the overall number of users of social networking sites has leveled off since 2013.

In many previous Pew Research reports, the share of social media users has been reported as the proportion of who had adopted such sites, rather than the full adult population, which continues to include a relatively small share (currently 15%) who still remain offline.

In this report, a broader picture of the American landscape is presented, and so the figures are based on the entire adult population.

Currently adoption rates for social media stand at 76% for those with college or graduate degrees, 70% of those with some college education and 54% for those who have a high school diploma or less.