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Psychology behind dating websites

You may or may not be familiar with documentary and TV show Catfish, which chronicles the very real problem (and devastating consequences) of deception in online dating.

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This is likely because the app gives users very little information other than geographic proximity, name, age and – of course – photos.“But in general, we can say that when you use any of these current social media platforms, you’re putting yourself out there for potential evaluation,” Petrie says.Here’s a little dating advice from the psychologist: consider why you’re there.The fact that there is little to go on when deciding whether or not to pursue another user is where evolutionary psychology comes in.Contrary to popular belief, many of the decisions that human beings make actually occur unconsciously, rather than logically.In most cases, people determine whether a potential partner is attractive, evaluate whether they would be categorized as more, less or equally attractive and then decide whether to move forward based on this information. An example of a career in psychology is marriage and family therapists, who help to treat couples and families who are going through emotional or behavioral problems.

To qualify for such a position, you would need to earn a According to the Pew study, one in five adults aged 25-34 years old have participated in online dating – but it’s popular with older singles too.

If daters have shared interests and experiences, it’s more likely that they will be able to click on a personal and conversational level.

It’s no secret that humans have a tendency to attribute positive characteristics like intelligence or honesty to those whom they consider to be physically attractive.

Questions like Compared to people who weren’t on the dating app, Tinder users had lower levels of self-worth, reported being less satisfied with their faces and looks and were more ashamed of their bodies.

They were also more likely to think of themselves as sexual objects, to internalize societal ideals about beauty, to compare their appearances to others and to constantly monitor how they looked, the researchers found. “If they used Tinder, they reported more negative scores on all of our measures,” says Trent Petrie, co-author of the paper and professor in the psychology department at the University of North Texas.

“We thought that was pretty interesting, given the fact that gender usually plays a role in how women and men respond to these types of questionnaires.” Women, it turns out, usually feel the worst about themselves.