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Statistics online dating 2016

statistics online dating 2016-49

Cacioppo acknowledged being a "paid scientific advisor" for the website, but said the researchers followed procedures provided by the Journal of the American Medical Association and agreed to oversight by independent statisticians.People who reported meeting their spouse online tended to be age 30-49 and of higher income brackets than those who met their spouses offline, the survey found.

The difference remained statistically significant even after controlling for variables like year of marriage, sex, age, education, ethnicity, household income, religion and employment status.Among couples who were still married during the survey, those who met online reported higher marital satisfaction -- an average score of 5.64 on a satisfaction survey -- than those who met offline and averaged 5.48.The lowest satisfaction rates were reported by people who met through family, work, bars/clubs or blind dates.According to New York City psychologist and author Vivian Diller, the seven-year study was too short to assess the long-term outcomes of relationships that begin online."Success in marriage is largely about how you negotiate differences, not just compatibility," she told AFP, adding that online dating can raise expectations and result in greater unhappiness.Read reviews and check ask friends about their experience with dating websites.

Another statistics shows that the share of 18 to 24 year olds who report having used online dating has nearly tripled since 2013.

Its important to be armed with the numbers so you don’t become a statistic. As you can see from the statistics, the percent of sex offenders who use online dating to meet people is huge!

Here are some interesting statistics about online dating (as of July 2016): Take a look at total number of people in the U. 10% – which means there are about 5 MILLION sex offenders in US only.

Online dating has ballooned into a billion-dollar industry and the Internet "may be altering the dynamics and outcome of marriage itself," said the study by U. researchers in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

However, some experts took issue with the findings because the survey was commissioned by e Harmony.com, the dating site that attracted one quarter of all online marriages according to the research.

"We found evidence for a dramatic shift since the advent of the Internet in how people are meeting their spouse," said the study, led by John Cacioppo of the University of Chicago's Department of Psychology.