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The vessel took a pilot on board entering the Mersey, but collided with Don, a schooner, & damaged Don & probably itself too when it came to rest against the King's Dock basin wall. 1 references the ship being sheathed in yellow metal & partly in felt in 1880 & fastened with copper bolts. 7, 1842, the vessel arrived at Liverpool in ballast, having discharged her cargo, loaded in Calcutta, India, at the port of London. for the account of William Adamson, of Sunderland (but registered at London) who owned the vessel per the Mercantile Navy List in 1870 thru 1880 & 1885 also.

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The business started up again in 1855, at Pallion, under William Adamson #2 (1815/1884). All said & done, folks were grateful that the Queen had included the shipyard in her country-wide Jubilee Tour. The ship was registered at Ardrossan, Ayrshire, Scotland. 143.0 metres long overall, 131.1 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 12 1/2 (or 13.5/14.0) knots, signal letters GHPB. Built for 'Booker Ship Finance Ltd.', related to 'Booker Bros. A., of Panama, having been part of a joint venture with Lidia Marine Corp. The vessel was sold in 1986 to 'Pyramis Shipping Ltd.', of Valletta, Malta, & was renamed Trader. In 1977, the vessel was sold to Greek owners, (which specific company? Temporary repairs were necessary before the ship could continue, & permanent repairs, I trust, were made to the lock gates! Alcock, Allison, Austin & Pickersgill, page bottom (aircraft carrier). That last comment ties in tidily with data supplied by Stan Mapstone (thanks! 27 in number but likely that number should be increased to at least 33 since the notes of Margot's grandfather covers 6 additional vessels not referenced by Archives. But there clearly is a lot more to be learned about the shipbuilding & ship owning history of the Adamson family. I am puzzled (1) with the reference to 'Adamson' being of New York, the ship going to New York to be completed (fittings etc.), & her maiden voyage being in 1841. I believe that, per LR, the vessel simply traded from Sunderland to New York from 1839/40 thru 1841/42 with 'Pringle' serving as her captain. Greyson became her captain in 1842/43 for service from Liverpool to Bombay & Calcutta, both India. 25, 1850 with 5 passengers & a varied cargo which included shipbuilding timbers, wool & oils. 6, 1850, the vessel arrived at Sydney having left Falmouth, Devon, on Jul. Not explained yet is why Suniper & Bobbina, modest vessels also, I think, built or completed at the old Austin Wear yard in 1962 & 1963, were numbered #823 & #824, in a sequence that basically seems to have related to the old Pickersgill Southwick yard. At or about May 20, 1985, the vessel arrived at the Alang, India, facilities of 'Ghaziram Gokulchand Shipbreaking Co.', to be broken up. Later he always followed the voyages of Iron Ore when he could he felt that a part of him was in that ship. It was sold again, in 1981, to 'Volcano Shipping S. Hogarth, Baron Wemyss (3)], 2 (image, Baron Wemyss), 3 & 4 (images, Bordabarri), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The owners of the Baron Line had, at one time, I read, a reputation for being 'economical' when feeding their crews, and, as a result, the line was nicknamed the 'Hungry Hogarths'. ) a particular voyage where the vessel was fitted out at Dagenham (River Thames, E. page bottom), 2 (same Inchona data 60% down), 3 (NZ), 4 [Inch Steamship, Inchona (3)], 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). From China she went to Hong Kong where she was re-named Cramond on Dec. I think the name change was so that it was not immediately apparent that the vessel had been trading into China, which could have caused a problem had she needed to go to Taiwan. ('Tatem') the owners & managers, both of London & Cardiff. The vessel was sold, in 1973, the very last 'Tatem' ship, in fact, to be sold, to 'Troodos Shipping', L. A year or so later, they sold the vessel to Pakistani ship breakers & on Apl. Per 1 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The vessel was sold, in 1986, to 'Rehmat Maritime Ltd.', of Gibraltar, & renamed Rehmat. 24, 1987, the vessel was wrecked in the East China Sea, NW of Taiwan, at N/1E. I have also seen a 'snippet' reference to United Ship Management Ltd., of Hong Kong, selling the vessel to Chinese ship breakers for a price in the region of $141.2 per ldt (light displacement tons perhaps? Sygna, which had waited 4 days to load, & was anchored about 3 miles off shore & 2 1/2 miles E. Ayre's Quay was, & maybe still is, located on the Deptford 'peninsula' a little below & to the south east of where Laing's had their Deptford shipbuilding yard. The article further indicates that 'Some few years afterwards the Adamsons removed from Sunderland to Birkenhead, near Liverpool'. Data exists today re the 1855 & onwards business of William Adamson (i.e. A build list is available of the ships that he built over the years of 1855 thru 1870, thanks, I understand, to David Ingram & to records at the 'Tyne & Wear Archives' ('Archives'). 15, 1851 with a dozen passengers & a varied cargo that included copper ore & wool. By then the last build # at the old Pickersgill yard was #912. So #1377 the next number in sequence was used re Empros & #1378 re Cluden. The vessel was sold in 1976 to 'Palmist Shipping Corporation S. Became Arma in 1984, owned by 'Arma Shipping Ltd.', of Valetta, Malta. The language used at the time could not be included in these pages - David describes it as being 'most educational'. The ship was registered at Ardrossan, Ayrshire, Scotland & managed by Scottish Ship Management Ltd., a Hogarth company. ) in essentially the following words:- Benhiant left Rosario with a cargo of wheat via Durban (arrived Durban Oct. The ship lay anchored in Pohai gulf, top end of the Yellow Sea, just off the coast at the bottom of the river leading up to Tientsin, for many weeks, there were a great deal of other ships waiting at anchorage for their turn to dock. In 1983, the vessel was sold again, to 'Milkyway SA', of Cyprus, & renamed Cyprus Trader. A warning was broadcast, & 7 of the 10 ships at anchorage at Newcastle went out to sea to ride it out.He wonders whether poor design or bad workmanship was the true cause of the vessel breaking her back in 1974 & whether, had that not happened, the ship would have been salvageable. Perhaps a large version of a fine image (see left) showing folks on shore holding a line from the ship when a rocket rescue of the crew was attempted. The vessel was sold, in 1983, to Atlantic Crown Maritime Co. of Limassol, Cyprus, 'Vernicos Maritime' the managers, & renamed Mariner. It was sold, in 1991, to Hyundai International & renamed Vivari II. to vessel 85% down), 3 (25% down), 4 (data & image, Agia Efimia), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). The first (or maybe the 2nd) Sunderland built vessel to have dual imperial & metric depth measurements marked on the hull. The vessel was sold, in 1974, to 'Vergocean Steamship Co.', of London, owned by George Vergottis, who in 1975 renamed the vessel Vergray. 141.0 metres long overall, 134.2 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, crew of 35, speed of 15 (or 14) knots. Gmb H KG', of Hamburg, Germany, & managed by 'K. Vineta Seerederei Gmb H.', also of Hamburg - but registered at Singapore. On May 23, 1996, the vessel arrived at ship breakers at Chittagong, Bangladesh, to be broken up. Much of the above was from data 'snippets', easily misinterpreted. 141 metres long overall, 134.2 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 15 knots, crew of 21, 6 passengers. The vessel suffered deck damage off the SW coast of France & arrived at Bilbao, Spain, for repairs on May 8, 1997. 13, 1998, the vessel was arrested at Mumbai, India, & likely saw no more service. 2, 1999, the vessel arrived at Mumbai ship breakers to be broken up. In 1993, the vessel was sold to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, (i.e. I am grateful for the data about the vessel's history, through 1996, at link 3. Per 1 ('pdf' file, Egon Oldendorff history, image & history Eibe Oldendorff at WWW p.128), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). A.', of Singapore, Egon Oldendorff, of Lbeck, West Germany, the manager. In 1995, the vessel was sold or maybe was rather chartered to "Coreck" Maritime Gmb H, of Hamburg, Germany. 11, 2002, the vessel arrived at Mumbai, India, ship breakers to be broken up.And sold again, in 1992, to Seamouth Shipping & renamed Armas. Built for 'Larrinaga Steamship Co., Ltd.', a tramp ship company, of Liverpool. However 2 states that the 1974 sale was to Valiant Steamship Co. The vessel was sold, in 1978, to Atheras Shipping Co. And renamed Afovos in 1986 & Atheras, yet again, later that year. Also in 1986, the vessel was sold to 'Flandermar Shipping', 'Agoudimos & Meletis', of Greece, the managers & renamed Agia Efymia. The vessel was sold, in 1980, to 'Seaward (or Seward) Maritime (or Marine) Inc.', of Panama, 'Wallen Shipmanagement Ltd.', of Hong Kong? Now there are references to other names in the ownership history, so the above may well need correction. As a result, the above text may well need correction. Originally ordered by 'Copacabana Shipping Co.', of Monrovia, Liberia. I am grateful for the extended data about the vessel's history, through 1996, at link 3. Per 1 ('pdf' file, Egon Oldendorff history, image Imme Oldendorff at WWW p#122 & data p#121), 2 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Margaronis', renamed Belle, & registered at Panama. North Korea), renamed Ocean Ho, & registered at Honduras. Per 1 ('pdf' file, Egon Oldendorff history, image & history Eibe Oldendorff at WWW p.128), 2 (data, near page bottom), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Because there seems to be very little other WWW data. 141.0 metres long overall, 134.21 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 15 knots, 6 passengers. I am grateful for the data about the vessel's history, through 1996, at link 3. Per 1 ('pdf' file, Egon Oldendorff history, image & history Hinrich Oldendorff at WWW p.126), 2 (image, Martin, & data), 3 (brief ref. $1.5 million, to 'Nika Shipping Ltd.', also of Valetta, 'Unit Maritime Inc.' the managers, & renamed Nika. 27, 1999, the ship sustained a hole in its shell plating resulting in water ingress & some cargo (sugar) damage. On May 31, 1999, the vessel arrived at Calcutta, India, ship breakers to be broken up. In 2001, the vessel was sold to 'Chios Pride Shipping & Trading SA', of Panama, with 'Harbor Shipping & Trading SA' soon the managers, of Greece and/or of Panama, & renamed Chios Sky. 19, 2004 to 'HK Da Hai Xiang Shipping', of China and/or of Panama & renamed Great Harmony.Flight Lieutenant Gary Mc Farlane, the pilot, was awarded the 'Air Force Cross' for his efforts that day & the outstanding conduct of his crew members were also recognised. During the course of those operations, the ship was swung around, the heavier stern section sank into deeper water & the ship broke its back. The stern section was re-floated first, but went aground again & settled into the sand. It would appear that due to an industrial dispute, no tug would come to tow it to Port Stephens & safety. And how frustrating it must have been for Taiseikaihatu in its efforts to salvage the ship. The bow was floated off successfully & winched out into deep water from where the oil drilling tender Lady Vera towed it to Port Stephens. 18, 1974, $1,600,000 was spent by Taiseikaihatu on the salvage operation, much of that sum going to Newcastle firms & workers with very little to show for it. Cromwell Shipping, of Malta, owning Dea & selling it to Greek interests, is another. After delivery, Brown-Boveri supervisory & automation systems were installed at Bremerhaven. 3, 1972, the vessel was transferred to 'Kommanditgesellschaft', 'Egon Oldendorff' the manager, both of Lbeck. 4, 1972, the vessel was transferred to 'Wursata Shipping Corporation', of Singapore, as bareboat charterers of the vessel. In 1988, the vessel was sold, 'for a price in the region of $2.1m.', to 'Sinzhong Lines Pte. Can anybody confirm or correct these name & ownership changes?

The vessel was considered to be too large to salvage, was designated a constructive total loss & insurance monies were paid out. (It may be that it was broken in two much much earlier. The bow was left on anchor in Salamander Bay for almost 2 years until it was towed to Kaohsiung, Taiwan, where it arrived on Feb. The stern of the ship still lies on Stockton Beach today, now badly eroded, 38 years after it ran aground. Also in 1991, the vessel was sold to 'Good Hope Shipping Ltd.', of Malta, & renamed Cedar Hill. In 1993, the vessel was sold to 'Navalplanet Shipping Ltd.', also of Limassol, & renamed Feax - no change of manager.

William Adamson #1, was building ships at Monkwearmouth as early as 1809. Which business moved to the Pann's area of Bishopwearmouth in the 1820s. And later that decade, in 1828, it would seem that William Adamson #1 retired, & William Bell joined the partnership which became 'Bell and Adamson'. There were many deaths en route, particularly of children. 26, 1853 with 246 emigrants aboard, 107 of which were under the age of 14. Austin & Pickersgill Limited was formed in 1954 by the merger of S. It perhaps should better be described as a 'shipyard drive-through', since the procession of cars did not in fact stop. Local schools were invited to attend, & one youngster later commented - 'The Queen went past like greased lightning'. But the vessel would seem to have been actually owned by 'Inch Steamship Company Ltd.' (a subsidiary of Williamson), which company ceased to be in 1966. 25, 1987 the vessel arrived at the Alang, Gujarat, India, ship breaking facilities of 'Chaudhary Industries', to be broken up. 40% down), 5 (image, Mahinda), 6 (Norwegian page, Mahinda), 7 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). Built for 'Vallum Shipping Company Ltd.', of Newcastle, which company was owned by 'Common Bros Ltd.' & Jardine Matheson Limited. 1984, the vessel arrived at Setbal, Portugal, to be broken up. 138.9 metres long overall, 455 ft., 129.6 metres perpendicular to perpendicular, speed of 15 1/2 knots. Ltd.', of Belfast, Northern Ireland, known as 'Head Line', G. 18, 1985 it arrived at Huangpu, China, to be broken up. 177.7 metres long, speed of 14 1/2 knots, signal letters GKZA. Homer, which also suffered major damage, (image at left), was repaired at Smith's, (of North Shields? ), that he was a Deck Cadet in early 1973 when the ship, after dry-docking at Hamburg for major repairs, left for Providence, Rhode Island.

For ease of understanding perhaps I should identify them here, for clarity, as being respectively William Adamson #1, #2 & #3. 9, 1852, the vessel left Torbay, Devon, for Moreton Bay (Brisbane, Queensland), Bell in command, with 263 emigrants. A prominent family in Sunderland history, it would seem. 15, 1977, on the occasion of her Silver Jubilee (1952/1977). From 1 & 2 (images Iron Barque, but you must be registered to see them), 3 (data, & image Iron Barque, 4th image down), 4 (Vallum ref. From 1 [Ulster Steamship, Torr Head (4)], 2 (image, Torr Head), 3 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). & Canada, &, in later years, in joint service with associated company Donaldson Line of Glasgow (Head-Donaldson Line). And the vessel was then sold, late in 1975, to 'Orient Shipping Corp.', of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Ekton. In 1985, the vessel was reported as being sold to Chinese ship breakers for a price in the region of $128 per ltd, & on Mar. Per 1 [Trader Navigation, Middlesex Trader (2)], 2 (1969 collision), 3 (image, Middlesex Trader, but you must be registered to see it), 4 (the damaged Elisa F., but you must be registered to see it), 5 (Miramar, link, you now must be registered to access). In late 1969, likely with both vessels travelling fast in the fog, Homer was in collision with Elisa F., in the Thames estuary. suffered a very large hole in her hull (4) but did not sink. In 1982, the vessel was sold to 'Telemachus Shipping Co. David Stewart of New Zealand advises, (thanks David!

An unsuccessful attempt was made to get a line aboard the ship & a life boat rescue was attempted also. A difficult situation, I read, & surely not the finest exhibit for the behaviour of the Australian workforce, (sorry, but that seems to be so). Originally ordered by 'Half Moon Shipping Co.', of Monrovia, Liberia. 2001, the vessel was sold to Chinese ship breakers & ii) in Dec. I am grateful for the extended data about the vessel's history, through 1996, at link 3. At the end of the charter, in 1977, the vessel was renamed Jocasta (Miramar refer to 'J. The vessel was sold, in 1976, to 'Canapel SA', or 'Canipel SA', of Panama, 'Empresa de Navigation Mambisa' of Cuba, likely the managers, & renamed Star I.

With great difficulty however, all 30 (or maybe 31) aboard were rescued by an Iroquois helicopter in near cyclone conditions. The Japanese worked all hours to accomplish the task, while the Australian crews insisted on double time for normal hours & double-double time for shift work & took off what time their agreements permitted. 1974 to extricate the stern section but without success - and a heavy oil spill resulted. But the contract was acquired, in 1969, by 'Egon Oldendorff', of Lbeck, West Germany & the vessel was delivered as Dorthe Oldendorff, the 3rd fleet vessel of the name. The vessel was sold, in 1991, to 'Campe SA', of Panama, & then to 'Canipel SA', & renamed Star that same year.

Margot's great great great grandfather, her great great grandfather, & her grandfather were all named William Adamson. Alcock', shipbuilder, of Low Street, Sunderland, in business in 1861. I do not know - hopefully a site visitor will be able to provide more data. A guestbook message advises us that 'The Father of Modern Sport. Alcock', by Keith Booth, published by Parrs Wood Press, of Manchester, in 2002, refers to the shipbuilding history of J. A fine image of him, taken in 1864 in full regalia, is available here. It covers the history of the three companies which together came to form the company i.e. I read that Queen Elizabeth II visited Austin & Pickersgill Limited on Jul. After being laid up for 4 months, the vessel sailed for Sunderland, where minor repairs were effected. In 1969, the vessel was sold to Doric Shipping Corp., of Piraeus, Greece, & renamed Homer. The vessel was sold again, in 1978, to 'Negocios del Mar S. It would seem that the vessel was sold, in 1980, to undisclosed principals, for around $3.55 million, (can that be correct? In 1984, the vessel was sold to Euston Shipping Co., of Valetta, Malta, & renamed Polo. 28, 1985, the vessel arrived at 'Nickson's' ship breaking facilities at Alang, Gujarat, India, to be broken up. In 1965, the vessel discharged 23,191 tons of bulk grain at Liverpool, the largest such single shipment to have then been handled there. In 1973, the vessel was sold to Ben Line Steamers Ltd., (William Thomson & Co.), of Leith (Edinburgh), Scotland, ('Ben Line') & renamed Benhiant.