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Updating avid microchip

updating avid microchip-63

Graham Whaley writes: On a similar vein to the LOGIC little logic analyser, I surveyed the market for small cheap units a few years back, and we decided on the from Intronix It is a 34 channel logic analyser that uses time compression to store samples in its rather small buffer, so if you have a slow moving signal you can get quite long traces.

updating avid microchip-29

The cool thing about it is that it provides complex triggering, and directly decodes CAN, I2C, SPI, and RS232 data streams.All in all, a very nice and capable unit that I use on a daily basis. Jerry Isdale wrote: I recommend taking a look at the offerings from Seeed Studios.Also, it looks like just came out with this one (their first MSO). In particular the , but their other (board only, no enclosure) products are quite cool and inexpensive.I did get a surprise one day when the supply tripped for apparently no reason. This is a 100 MHz USB MSO with two analog channels, eight digital channels (nine if you include the external trigger which can be displayed along with the other digital channels), and 4 mega-points of memory.Turned out an unused supply was current limited to 0.000 A. Chris Svec also has a GW Instek power supply: I have a GW Instek dual output power supply which is just okay - it's got a loud fan that runs all the time, and the voltage output seems to drift a bit, but that could be because I nudge the sloppy control dials unknowingly. The sampling rate is 100 MSa/sec (one-shot = 10 MHz) which is more than enough for the embedded work I do.I purchased it shortly after it was released, on the _promise_ that they'd soon have a Mac and Linux client.

It took longer than I liked, since I had to run it in a VMWare virtual machine on my Mac, but eventually they released a cross-platform software package. Finally an embedded tools vendor that understands there's other operating systems out there than Windows.

It's hard to put a "time-saved" number on it as things suddenly jump out at you instantly when you can see the decoded bus in real time!

Steve de Rosier is yet another one who likes the : I too love the Logic. But perhaps the best thing about it is the software is cross-platform.

The unit itself is small and travel-friendly, packaged in a rugged aluminum housing, uses a standard 0.1" header for probe interconnects, and has wonderful support software (Windows, Mac, and Linux OS are all supported).

At 24 MHZ acquisition rate, it's certainly not fast enough to handle external address/data busses on a high-speed modern u P or u C - for that, you need to shell out big bucks for a "real" logic analyzer.

It also has a beautiful and intuitive user interface that seems leaps beyond the others I've looked at.